Professional Development

Over the past two months, it feels like I have watched more webinars than I have in the last two years. I am sure that is the case for many of you.
Middle school band is often where students begin their musical journey. It is a time when the three basic elements of music — rhythm, melody and harmony — begin to take shape and make sense to students. 
Most music educators, choir directors, composers or music students have likely used a music notation program for a variety of reasons including:
Electric string ensembles in school music programs are not the far-fetched idea they once were. 
“The quest to explore different traditions from around the world outside of classical music has really felt like a quest to discover more about myself,” says Mike Block. 
  Tradeshows can be powerful ways for music educators to hone new skills, network and find inspiration. But as attendees go to sessions and roam exhibit halls, the experience can be overwhelming. 
Music educators are no strangers to evaluation. Often, these evaluations happen when a cul­minating activity — like a festival, concert or recital — presents a finished product for consideration.
Chamber ensembles allow students to practice and perform with like-minded musicians while providing camaraderie. 
Every year I attend the National Association of Music Merchants (NAMM) Advocacy Fly-In in Washington, D.C. 
Cellist Mike Block, an associate professor at Berklee College of Music, remembers a huge moment from when he was in college at the Cleveland Institute of Music. 

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