Professional Development

Inclusion is at the heart of United Sound, a peer mentoring program that provides musical performance experiences for students with special needs (called New Musicians). 
Being a first-year music teacher is challenging. A big hurdle is applying the knowledge you gained during your formal education while building practical knowledge, which is usually learned on-the-fly once you enter the workforce.
The beginning of the school year is a good time for music educators to create a better routine for good mental health for themselves and their students.
When it comes to teaching and/or performing in the field of music, almost everyone has or will have to deal with “burnout,” which is a mental collapse due to stress.
Over the past two months, it feels like I have watched more webinars than I have in the last two years. I am sure that is the case for many of you.
Middle school band is often where students begin their musical journey. It is a time when the three basic elements of music — rhythm, melody and harmony — begin to take shape and make sense to students. 
Most music educators, choir directors, composers or music students have likely used a music notation program for a variety of reasons including:
Electric string ensembles in school music programs are not the far-fetched idea they once were. 
“The quest to explore different traditions from around the world outside of classical music has really felt like a quest to discover more about myself,” says Mike Block. 
  Tradeshows can be powerful ways for music educators to hone new skills, network and find inspiration. But as attendees go to sessions and roam exhibit halls, the experience can be overwhelming. 

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